Does Animation Facilitate Better Learning in Primary Education? A Comparative Study of Three Different Subjects

Author(s): M. Shreesha, Sanjay Kumar Tyagi

ABSTRACT
The research and innovation in the field of computer and technology has made significant contribution for the development of new pedagogical strategies in all levels of education. The use of digital tools like animation has changed the way of providing education, especially in primary school level, adding an element of entertainment to the process of teaching and learning. It is assumed that the use of animated instructional material can help to present a complex concept in a simple form, create more interest about the subject, motivate the pupil for better learning, increase the accuracy of the message and play a crucial role in improving the students’ academic performance. Against this background, the present paper attempts to assess the efficacy of animation on different subjects in primary education. Here, in the study, an experiment has been conducted using animation to teach three subjects Mathematics, Language and Science; and students’ performance was compared and analyzed using fuzzy statistical tools.

Source:

Journal: Creative Education
DOI: 10.4236/ce.2016.713183

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Paper Id: 69853 (metadata)

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