A Simulation of Signal Collisions over the North Atlantic for a Spaceborne ADS-B Receiver Using Aloha Protocol

Author(s):Richard Van Der Pryt, Ron Vincent

ABSTRACT

CanX-7 ADS-B receiver reception coverage (circle) with −103 dBm sensitivity at 800 km altitude (AGI STK Software).
CanX-7 ADS-B receiver reception coverage (circle) with −103
dBm sensitivity at 800 km altitude (AGI STK Software).

Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) is an air traffic surveillance system in which aircraft broadcast GPS position, velocity and status on 1090 MHz at random intervals between 0.4 and 0.6 seconds. ADS-B networks for air traffic monitoring have been implemented worldwide, but ground stations cannot be installed in oceanic regions, leaving these areas uncovered. A solution for tracking aircraft over the ocean is through the monitoring of ADS-B signals by using spaceborne receivers. The Royal Military College of Canada has developed an ADS-B receiver that is scheduled to fly as a technology demonstrator on the Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiment-7 (CanX-7) nanosatellite. The payload will collect ADS-B data over the North Atlantic that will be compared to truth data provided by air traffic services. A potential issue for the CanX-7 payload is signal collisions. The extended footprint of the satellite coverage means that a large number of aircraft may be in view at any one time, leading to ADS-B messages that arrive simultaneously at the receiver not being decoded. A simulation of CanX-7 passage over the operations area was carried out to calculate the probability of signal collisions. Using the Aloha Protocol, it was determined that the loss of information as a result of signal collisions is well within the standards of ground based radars used by air traffic system agencies.

Source:

Journal: Positioning
DOI: 10.4236/pos.2015.63003 (PDF)
Paper Id: 58012 (metadata)

See also: Comments to Paper

About scirp

(SCIRP: http://www.scirp.org) is an academic publisher of open access journals. It also publishes academic books and conference proceedings. SCIRP currently has more than 200 open access journals in the areas of science, technology and medicine. Readers can download papers for free and enjoy reuse rights based on a Creative Commons license. Authors hold copyright with no restrictions. SCIRP calculates different metrics on article and journal level. Citations of published papers are shown based on Google Scholar and CrossRef. Most of our journals have been indexed by several world class databases. All papers are archived by PORTICO to guarantee their availability for centuries to come.
This entry was posted in POS and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.